Robbing the poor

The BBC pays out huge salaries to executives and celebrities alike. Her bureaucracy grows exponentially. Her undemocratic licence fee has become an anachronism in the days of multi-channel satellite television.

‘If the BBC really does depend on the licence fee for its survival, then there must be some genuine checks and balances. What better way than democratising the licence fee?’

‘It would be similar to shareholders having the ability to hire and fire their board, but with one main difference-every licence fee payer would hold just one share and one vote.’

Today never has so much money been paid to employees for so little work whilst the public are forced to pay billions in licence fees. The true word it isn’t a licence fee it is a TAX  

Almost a hundred people are sent to prison every year for not paying this this I think is against their human rights 

The whole point of the licence fee is to protect the BBC’s political independence and impartiality by providing it with a source of funding that is outside the hands of governments and politicians. Thanks to this FoI response, we now learn that it has been going cap in hand to the EU for millions of pounds on the quiet over the last few years. Such outrageous flouting of the principles on which the BBC is based and funded will only promote cynicism about its political impartiality and lead to a loss of trust in the BBC’s independence. Information received on my article the BBC refuse to declare where they spent the EU money this undermines Brexit.

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Human’s Best Friend

Bred by Humans for Humans

petershakespearebaxter

Human history of domesticating animals which we now recognise as companion dogs began with the grey wolf (canis lupus) tens of thousands of years ago. Archaeological and DNA evidence shows that today’s domestic dogs (canis lupus familiaris) descend from a specific lineage of grey wolves, and began around 15,000 years ago.

How did mankind come to domesticate wolves- and more importantly, why? The foundation of the domestication of wolves evolved from the symbiotic or mutually beneficial relationship that early humans had with these animals. Wolves and their descendants provided people with protection and security, help with hunting for animals to provide fur and meat, guarding livestock, and pulling carts.

Wolves are scavenging animals, and would have been attracted to the villages and campsite of early human societies because of the rubbish and animal remains which were generated by the community. Once they established that the supply of food was consistent…

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Perennial Robotic Earth

Many food plants can live through winters, even in northern climates, and bear food every year. Hardy perennial food plants include common vegetables like asparagus and rhubarb, herbs like thyme and sage, and fruiting plants from groundcover strawberries to caning blackberries and shrubby currants to tree crops like apples, cherries, pears, and hazelnuts.

They also include less common crops, crops that native Americans used as well as food plants from other parts of the world. Like Jerusalem artichokes, which are the tuberous roots of a member of the sunflower family. Or the British foliage plants known as potherbs, which include Good King Henry, sorrel,, lemon balm, and other perennials whose leaves were eaten raw in salads and also used to add flavor and nutrients to soups and hot dishes.

Once they are settled in your garden, these plants grow and bear more crops as the years pass, and most of them demand less work with each passing year. There’s no replanting, no tilling the soil, no yanking out and disposing of dead plants. There is only a minimal amount of caring for the live plants, and of course, harvesting the food.

We might be able to leave that to robots

70% More Food

With an ever increasing population, the production of food needs to increase. It is estimated that a 70% increase in food production is needed by 2050 in order to meet the needs of the worlds growing population. 

Simply planting more crops is no longer a viable option. New varieties of plants can in some cases be developed through plant breeding that generate an increase of yield without relying on an increase in land area. An example of this can be seen in Asia, where food production has increased twofold recently.

This has been achieved through not only the use of fertilisers, but through the use of better crops that have been specifically designed for Asia. 

We need to cultivate large areas where modern breeding can work

Iceland is working on this now and Greenland may also be cultivated in parts.

Darwin’s Natural Selection has no part to play in this we need modern technology from the agricultural colleges worldwide who are best placed to gain success for everyone and understand how to breed. 

This is more important than going to the moon.

Human’s Best Friend

Human history of domesticating animals which we now recognise as companion dogs began with the grey wolf (canis lupus) tens of thousands of years ago. Archaeological and DNA evidence shows that today’s domestic dogs (canis lupus familiaris) descend from a specific lineage of grey wolves, and began around 15,000 years ago.

How did mankind come to domesticate wolves- and more importantly, why? The foundation of the domestication of wolves evolved from the symbiotic or mutually beneficial relationship that early humans had with these animals. Wolves and their descendants provided people with protection and security, help with hunting for animals to provide fur and meat, guarding livestock, and pulling carts.

Wolves are scavenging animals, and would have been attracted to the villages and campsite of early human societies because of the rubbish and animal remains which were generated by the community. Once they established that the supply of food was consistent, they would stay around in order to benefit from it, coming to view the village or area as part of their territory and chasing off predators and other wolf packs accordingly.

In time, man and wolf became used to each other’s presence and unconcerned with each other’s existence within the same area, leading to a mutually beneficial relationship which evolved over many years. The wolves (and later dogs) side of the deal included getting a regular source of food, warmth and safety. Mankind’s deep mutual affection for dogs evolved out of this relationship and is as strong today as it ever was. This is a form of love and some dogs are buried with their owners in grave yards. Hoping to be together in the after life.

This cannot be called natural selection but beneficial selection leading to love same way as marriage. 

 

Educate your Baby

 Humans are born with very few innate behaviours or animal instincts. For example, whereas many animals (insects, fish, reptiles, amphibians, etc.) are fully capable of walking, feeding themselves and even surviving independently after birth, human babies can do practically nothing after birth and cannot survive without a carer.

The difference here is that the DNA of humans does not specify a wiring diagram for the brain. Rather this wiring diagram is formed in response to the experiences of the baby. For example, if you were to take a newly born baby and cover its eyes for its entire early childhood, the child’s neural circuitry for interpreting visual stimuli would not develop and the child would be blind despite the fact that the child’s eyes work perfectly well.  I have witnessed a blind person get his sight back but could only use his eyes sight without meaning. Another consequence of this strategy is that everyone will develop different neural circuits to perform the same functions. Activating a specific nerve in humans would likely trigger very different responses in different individuals depending on upbringing.

The Important factor is a baby needs a full education for the first years of its life.